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Random Stuff...

Posts about lots of stuff...whatever shiny object happens to catch my eye at any given moment.
Aug 29 '14
innovateky:

Electricity running between lines looks like a wizard’s duel.

innovateky:

Electricity running between lines looks like a wizard’s duel.

Aug 29 '14
"Vaccines protect the health of children in the United States so well that most parents today have never seen first-hand the devastating consequences of diseases now stopped by vaccines"
Aug 29 '14

Anonymous asked:

theyre called dad jokes because theyre cheesy jokes a dad would say to their child...

bestnatesmithever:

bestnatesmithever:

Dad jokes have a specific style and pattern. 

"I’m hungry."

"Nice to meet you, Hungry. I’m dad."

That’s a typical pattern for a Dad joke. 


"Can I go to the bathroom?"

"I don’t know, CAN you?" 

That’s another typical Dad joke. 

The joke, “How does NASA organize a party? They planet.” is a pun. Just a straight up pun. Good old fashioned pun. 

image

Hmmm…well in that case literally ANY joke can be a Dad joke so long as it A. Doesn’t make the audience laugh and B. The one telling the joke IS laughing. 

So how would we know if a joke on the Internet is a Dad Joke unless we had confirmation that the joke teller is laughing? 

I do respect and appreciate thefrogman's comedic intellect, but I think this definition of Dad Joke is problematic.

I always considered the classic “dad joke” to be a reaction to something that somebody else said.  For example, the child says something to set up the joke; “I’m hungry”, and then the dad responds with “Hi Hungry, my name is Dad!”.  The classic one at my house growing up was always after I’d say “I’m full” at the dinner table.  My dad would react by yelling “You’re a fool, alright!”.  They all follow the same pattern: 1) somebody (usually a child) unintentionally sets up the joke  2) dad responds by delivering lame punch line  3) nobody but dad laughs.

There also needs to be a certain level of innocence to the joke.  They need to be the type of joke that you can tell to a 3 year old.  The “That’s what she said.” joke would also follow the pattern above, but there almost always a sexual meaning behind that, so I feel like it doesn’t meets the criteria of a classic dad joke.

The “How does NASA plan a party?” joke would involve the same person delivering the set up and the lame punch line.  It would also probably result in nobody but the joke teller laughing, but since that person gave the setup and the punch line, I fell like it falls outside of the dad joke definition.  While it is a bad joke, and not all bad jokes are dad jokes.

Aug 28 '14
Aug 28 '14
kqedscience:

wnycradiolab:

thekidshouldseethis:

Water Balloons Falling (and Bouncing) in Slow Motion.
Rewatch the video.

Well. That’s awesome.

Mesmerizing…

kqedscience:

wnycradiolab:

thekidshouldseethis:

Water Balloons Falling (and Bouncing) in Slow Motion.

Rewatch the video.

Well. That’s awesome.

Mesmerizing…

Aug 28 '14
Aug 27 '14

nerdology:

Ok, enough links. Take a look at these Truth Facts!

[TruthFacts via LikeCool]

Aug 25 '14
theworldairforce:

Unstoppable || John Dibbs
Kittyhawk, Spitfire, Mustang & Corsair

theworldairforce:

Unstoppable || John Dibbs

Kittyhawk, Spitfire, Mustang & Corsair

Aug 20 '14
Aug 14 '14

bobbycaputo:

The Problem with Shark Week

Shark Week used to be educational. Now it’s filled with fake documentaries about “Megalodon” and “Submarine”. Vox explains what you need to know before you watch The Discovery Channel series. You can read the entire article on Vox, which includes interesting links to other pieces about the now maligned series. (Via.)

Megalodon was my breaking point.  I watched that episode last year, and I gave up on Shark Week.  Haven’t watched it since.  It’s too bad, I used to love Shark Week as a kid.